Can You Walk On A Sprained Ankle?

Ah, our old friend the sprained ankle. It always seems to happen when we least expect, doesn’t it? Walking too close to the edge of the sidewalk. Coming down the mountain from a hike.

Stepping across the road in heels.

Even the slightest misstep can cause a painful sprain that can linger for weeks, even months. No one wants to be off their feet for too long, especially athletes and fans of regular exercise. The question is, can you walk on a sprained ankle?

Walk on a Sprained Ankle By Taking the Weight Off

The answer is: it depends on the severity of the sprain. There are three grades used to evaluate ankle sprains:

  • Grade I
  • Grade II
  • Grade III (most severe)

Although the first temptation might be to “walk it off,” this can cause more damage to stretched or torn ligaments and prolong recovery time. It’s important not to overdo it or get ahead of yourself: walking too soon on a sprained ankle can lead to reinjury, pain, and more chronic conditions like arthritis.

There are a few important activities that help people work through a sprained ankle:

  • RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation)
  • Re-strengthening exercises
  • Rebuilding stability, balance, and flexibility
  • Gradually introducing weight-bearing activities

How to Gradually Introduce Weight Bearing on a Sprained Ankle

Traditionally, crutches, boots, and braces are used to eliminate or significantly reduce the body-weight impact on a sprained ankle. This reduces injury risk and allows time to begin rebalancing and restrengthening the injured ankle.

Our very own AlterG AntiGravity Treadmill™ is often deployed to help patients recovering from ankle sprains. The Anti-Gravity Treadmill allows therapists to add body weight in small increments, monitor pain and use gait analysis to fine-tune walking or running mechanics. The result is a drastic reduction of re-injury risk and shorter recovery times altogether.

Recommended reading: Read our Grade III lateral ankle sprain protocol on our clinical resources page. In this case study, the Anti-Gravity Treadmill was used to gradually re-introduce weight bearing and build the strength and flexibility of the injured ankle. The results are remarkable.

6 Tips for Running in Your Fifties

Though it might feel like a steeper hill to climb, running in your fifties is definitely possible. Maintaining a regular running program doesn’t have to be a casualty of age! In fact, running can be quite a boon to your well-being as you age.

Yet, running in your fifties brings with it different considerations than, say, running in your twenties. Certain aspects of the program that you used to take for granted can now be the difference between a healthy routine and injury, chronic pain, and slow progress. Here are six tips to do it right:

1. Listen to Your Doctor
Start at the doctor’s office. The doctor will make recommendations about whether you are fit and healthy enough to run at all (and at what intensity). This information will help you design the right program for your age and fitness level.

2. Prioritize Recovery
Turning fifty doesn’t mean you can’t run anymore, but it might mean that recovery times might increase. At the age of fifty, perhaps more than ever in your past, recovery time will become terribly important. Make sure to leave enough time for sleep and take adequate rest days between runs. Work on proper diet and sleep to maximize recovery.

3. Tap into Flexibility, Stabilizers, and Balance
Running in and of itself asks a lot of our core strength, flexibility, and balance. Running in your fifties asks a bit more. Still, focusing on these areas can create a base that allows you to run longer and safer while limiting pain and injury.

4. Play the Long Game
As we age, it takes longer to make improvements and reach new heights in our running programs. It’s important to resist the temptation to overdo it, as injuries from overuse or overexertion also take longer to recover from in our fifties and beyond. The more in tune we are with our adjusted timelines, the longer we’ll be able to sustain a healthy program over time.

5. Consider Group Training
Running with other peers in your age group is a great way to calibrate your routine and stay within yourself. There are plenty of fifty-plus running groups in most cities. Take the leap and see how nice it is to run each week with people who share in and understand what it means to run in your fifties.

6. Say Goodbye to Younger You, Embrace the New You
Our final tip is all about outlook. Yes, it is true that we might lose some ability, conditioning, and capacity as we age. And it can be difficult to come to terms with what we feel like we’re capable of in our minds and what our bodies can actually do. Still, the sooner you embrace the “new you,” the quicker you’ll be able to adapt the right habits and approaches that make running in your fifties better than ever.

How to Increase Your Running Distance Safely

Establishing and maintaining a running program is always a challenge. Staying consistent, keeping things interesting, and pushing past the wall requires commitment. Adding more miles can be a whole other can of worms.

In the spirit of taking your program to the next level, here’s how to safely increase running distance while limiting your risk of injury and exhaustion.

Track Your Progress

Just as keeping a daily journal can help you keep a diet, so to can it help you improve your running program. We recommend setting a weekly mileage goal, then charting the miles you run every week. After you’ve hit your mark a few weeks in a row, review your logs to inform how many miles to add to your weekly total (and when).

Mix Up Distance and Running Routes

Whoever you talk to, boredom is the number one excuse for not running. Don’t let the tedium stunt your program! If you love running the same route every day, try reversing it every once in a while. Work in hills, mix up distances throughout the week. Assign one of your days for a “longer” run.

Load Up Before Your Rest Day

To that end, try planning your long run the day before a rest day. Knowing that you’ll have the next day to rest will give you the confidence to push it, both in terms of distance and pace.

Unlock the Power of Recovery Time

Speaking of rest days, your off days can be as important to adding distance than your “on” days. Rest days give your body time to recover and adapt. This means not only working rest days into your routine but making the most of that rest time by eating well and staying hydrated.

Finally, Listen to Your Body

Of all the ways to safely add distance to your running program, listening to your body is one of the most important. This doesn’t mean skipping run days because you don’t feel like it, no. Listening to your body means reading any indicators of overuse, exhaustion, and injury.

Because putting your body out of commission won’t do you any good when trying to add miles to your running program.

Learn how the Anti-Gravity Treadmill™ can help improve your running.

 

4 Simple Ways to Prevent an ACL Tear

It’s the pop that no one ever wants to hear. The knee buckles, the athlete goes down, and the season is over. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear can be an abrupt and painful end to a season or even a career. It is a serious setback that usually requires surgery and leads to long term conditions such as osteoarthritis.

What is an ACL Tear?
Your ACL is located in the knee joint and controls the movement of your shinbone in relation to the thigh bone. Direct impact, sudden stops and changes of direction, or turns and awkward landings are what most often lead to ACL injuries.

The injury itself is usually indicated by an audible pop, a buckling knee, immediate swelling, pain, and an inability to put weight on the affected limb. Given the movements that most commonly lead to ACL tears, you’ll frequently find this injury in soccer, football, and basketball (among other similar sports).

How to Prevent ACL Tears
An ACL tear can happen to anyone and a lot of factors contribute to the injury. Here are four sound ways to help prevent this injury:

1. Know, Prepare, and Listen to Your Body
Preparation and body awareness go a long way in preventing ACL tears. This includes properly warming up and stretching before all workouts, understanding proper body positioning (stance, how you push off and land, etc.), and avoiding “playing through” knee pain which can lead to overuse injuries and weakness.

2. Fortify Your Ligaments
As with most injuries and conditions, good nutrition and proper hydration are important parts of keeping ligaments healthy and strong. Eating lots of colorful fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, nuts and legumes will help ensure that your ligaments get the protein, calcium, and other nutrients they need to stay strong and protected from injury. Diet and nutrition are one of the most overlooked aspects of injury prevention.

3. Strengthen the Supporting Cast
The ability of your ACL to withstand athletic activities without injury depends in part on the strength, flexibility, and health of the surrounding muscle groups. It is important to strengthen the hamstrings. It is also useful to think of the entire chain of muscles involved in a given movement. Working to improve balance, agility, flexibility, and core strength will help you control the body and eliminate the need for compensatory movements that sometimes lead to injury.

4. Lower the Impact
For people at risk of ACL tears, such as those with previous knee injuries or older adults, there are ways to exercise while lowering the body-weight impact on the knees.

Pool training, for example, is a highly effective (and taxing!) way to continue training while reducing the risk of knee injury. For the purposes of training, therapy, and injury recovery, precision unweighting tools like the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill™ are a highly effective way to reduce the body-weight impact on the knee.

One patient, a Division I soccer player, suffered a severe ACL tear and completed a walking program on the Anti-Gravity Treadmill. The progressive loading and gait monitoring allowed her to recover, maintain cardiovascular fitness, and return to her sport sooner than expected. Read the ACL tear case study.

What’s the Difference Between Static and Dynamic Stretching?

Stretching is a lot like flossing. We know that it’s important and that we should be doing it. We know that it helps our bodies in the long run. Yet so many of us still skip this important activity altogether.

And just like skipping flossing, failing to properly stretch is a mistake. Done right, stretching helps us improve our range of motion, flexibility, and recovery time. For anyone serious about their fitness, stretching is non-negotiable, both before and after workouts. That goes for everything from weightlifting and gymnastics to basketball, volleyball, and rec league hockey.

Typically, a complete stretching program consists of both static and dynamic stretches. The question is, what’s the difference? And when is it best to do one or the other? Here’s a closer look at the difference between static and dynamic stretches, common applications, and some examples.

The Difference Between Static and Dynamic Stretching

The difference between static and dynamic stretching comes down to a simple thing: movement. A static stretch is, generally, any position you hold—often at the limit of a given joint’s range of motion—to increase flexibility. A lack of movement—hence the name static—is common to all of these stretches. No bouncing, changing position, or repetition of movement.

Applications of Static Stretching

  1. Flexibility
  2. Post-workout recovery
  3. Preventing bruising and soreness

3 Examples of Static Stretches

  • Standing hamstring foldover (touch your toes)
  • Seated groin and inner thigh stretch
  • Overhead triceps stretch

A dynamic stretch is any repetitive, more challenging motion aimed at loosening up muscles and joints. Usually, dynamic stretches are sports- or activity-based motions one repeats a number of times. If it feels challenging, it’s supposed to be. Watch professional athletes before a game or match and you’ll likely see them go through some form of dynamic stretching routine.

Applications of Dynamic Stretching

  1. Pre-workout warmup
  2. Endurance and conditioning training

3 Examples of Dynamic Stretches

  • High knees
  • Walking lunges
  • Lateral crossovers

Understanding the difference between static and dynamic stretching is the first step toward incorporating these important movements into your workouts.

If stretching remains on your list of need to do that more (ahem, right next to flossing), try this: select three to five dynamic stretches and perform them before your next workout. After your routine, perform three to five static stretches. Set a goal to apply this stretching routine to each workout for two weeks.

You’ll be amazed at the difference.