4 Ways to Safely Achieve Your New Year’s Resolutions

In the spirit of optimism and support, we salute your new year’s resolutions, whatever they may be. In our experience, what separates those who achieve their new year’s resolutions and those who don’t is simple: setting and pursuing resolutions in an intelligent, safe way.

Failing to do so can not only derail a person’s gung-ho pursuit of newly minted resolutions, but lead to pain, injury, and unexpected consequences. Here are four ways to safely achieve your new year’s resolutions.

1. Make informed resolutions

One reason resolutions are so appealing is because they show us where we want to be. They do little, however, to remind us of where we are today. Before setting resolutions, take a detailed inventory of your baselines.

This should start with a visit to the doctor for a routine physical. This appointment will give you baseline numbers around your height, weight, heart rate, and other key diagnostics. Blood work and urine samples can help identify any other risk factors you might consider before starting a workout program.

Aside from  physician’s approval to exercise, you can also get a body composition assessment to get numbers around body fat percentage, BMI and other baseline indicators. If your resolutions include running, gait assessment and analysis can prove highly informative. All of this information will help you identify safe goals to set and give you concrete numbers to measure your progress against.

2. Under promise and over deliver (not the other way around)

A surefire way to fall short of fulfilling your new year’s resolutions is to set unrealistic goals. This is also a good way to find yourself out of commission due to injury. Avoid this common pitfall by setting specific goals that are both achievable and sustainable.

Instead of making a resolution to lose fifty pounds, aim for the first ten by the first of March. If your goal is to do the splits, start by touching your toes. Overly ambitious goals can lead you to push yourself unsafely, increase injury risk, and be too hard on yourself should you fail to achieve resolutions that might have been wildly unrealistic in the first place.

3. Remember that sudden change can shock the system

Though a shock to the system can sometimes be a good thing, it can also be dangerous for certain people, body types, and conditions. Rapid weight loss for obese individuals, for instance, or going from a sedentary lifestyle to marathon training can lead to injury, complications, and unforeseen consequences. Consult with a physician first and always remember the age-old adage: baby steps to the bus.

4. Believe in the basics and insist on them

Without adequate rest, a relatively balanced diet, and plenty of water, few resolutions have any chance of flowering. That’s like hopping into a car with no oil, coolant, or fuel, then expecting it to make a trip across the country! Put yourself in a better position to succeed by defining a list of five fundamentals, and then obsess over them.

Examples might be getting eight hours of sleep at least five nights a week, or drinking eight eight-ounce glasses of water a day. No food, not even snacks, after 8:00 or 9:00 pm. Always stretching before (warm-up) and after (cool-down) exercise. The more consistently you make good on these fundamentals, the better equipped you’ll be to make good on your greater resolutions. In fact, consistently doing these things on a daily basis could be a resolution in and of itself.

Because Safe Resolutions are Strong Resolutions

The new year is in full swing and we hope your resolutions are, too. We believe in you! We also believe in setting safe, realistic goals and putting yourself in the best position to be successful. You’ve got this! Follow the four fundamental steps above and you’ll be well on your way to always making your new year’s resolutions come true.

What are the Best Exercises for Obese Patients?

Training obese and overweight clients require a balanced, incremental approach. Immobility and the inherent risk for injury, heart attack, and even stroke—it all makes starting with basic movements and stabilization exercises a must. But even the most basic stabilization exercises may be too difficult for overweight patients to attempt. The result can be a frustrated patient and physical setbacks with the potential to derail physical therapy and fitness programs altogether. Continue reading “What are the Best Exercises for Obese Patients?”

Where The American Diet Went Wrong: What We Can Learn From The Healthiest People On Earth

In the 1930s, an American dentist named Weston A. Price made it his mission to discover what was responsible for optimal dental health. For over 10 years he traveled to various parts of the world to study different populations that had been relatively unaffected by western civilization. His travels included rural villages in Switzerland, indigenous North and South American tribes, Polynesian and Melanesian Islanders, Australian Aborigines, and New Zealand Maori. Continue reading “Where The American Diet Went Wrong: What We Can Learn From The Healthiest People On Earth”

Moonwalking to a Healthy Weight

You’ve heard the eye-brow-raising statistics: 66 percent of Americans are overweight and almost 38 percent of all of us are obese. That rate is alarmingly higher than it was a generation ago, according to the annual report The State of Obesity.

If you’re overweight, you probably know it. But if you’re truly not sure why you don’t fit into your jeans from high school, consider that the World Health Organization (WHO) defines an overweight person with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 and an obese person with a BMI of 30 or more. Continue reading “Moonwalking to a Healthy Weight”

Stuck in a Rut On Your Road to Weight Loss? Try Defying Gravity!

It’s no secret that America’s collective waistline has been expanding over the last few decades. What may surprise you, however, is just how many extra notches we have had to add to our national belt. According to the CDC, a staggering 70.7% of adults are overweight, with 37.9% falling within the “obese” category.

These startling statistics aren’t a simple matter of national vanity either. Indeed, we are on the edge of the precipice of a healthcare crisis, due to the rapidly increasing numbers of people suffering from obesity related conditions, such as Type II Diabetes, Osteoarthritis, and Hypertension.
Continue reading “Stuck in a Rut On Your Road to Weight Loss? Try Defying Gravity!”

Age, Obesity, And Arthritis: How To Help Patients Overcome All 3

Remember when normal wear and tear was the main culprit for knee osteoarthritis?

With a growing obesity epidemic, joint degradation—and pain—often come from excessive weight, according to a September 2010 study in research journal Current Opinion in Rheumatology. This is particularly true in 40- to 60-year-old age group of men and women.

The trifecta of age, obesity, and osteoarthritis is actually now a triple threat, which can rack your patients’ lives with chronic pain and make your job doubly hard. Continue reading “Age, Obesity, And Arthritis: How To Help Patients Overcome All 3”

Physical Therapy Boosts Orthopedic and Bariatric Surgery Outcomes for Obese Patients

Most people recognize that an exercise program is critical to weight management and weight loss. But for adult obese patients who are prospects for bariatric or orthopedic surgery, this concept is a double-edged sword.

Exercise to achieve weight loss is necessary to prepare for both types of surgery and improve outcomes.

For bariatric patients, it means they are more likely to keep the weight off. For orthopedic patients, it means the joint surgery is more likely to be successful, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Continue reading “Physical Therapy Boosts Orthopedic and Bariatric Surgery Outcomes for Obese Patients”

Kick Your Osteoarthritis Pain to the Curb with AlterG

Let’s do a quick thought experiment. I want you to consider the word “aging” and all that it connotes for you. Now close your eyes and craft a mental picture of “aging.” I’m betting that most of your imaginary paintings are not of the Bob Ross “happy little cloud” variety. It seems most of us regard aging as a slow, inevitable decline in our health and wellness, one that is futile to resist. In particular, chronic conditions of age, such as osteoarthritis, are painful reminders of the degeneration of our bodies in seemingly permanent ways. After all, we are (unfortunately) not starfish; we don’t have magical joint regeneration powers, and cartilage damage is irreversible. What are we to do then, in the face of this osteoarthritis monster lurking under our beds, just waiting for us to sprout that first grey hair? Continue reading “Kick Your Osteoarthritis Pain to the Curb with AlterG”

Easily Achieve your 2016 Fitness Resolutions

It may be cliché, but the “New Year-new you” spirit is here again. By now we are all well-aware that, in order to achieve optimal health, we need to get moving! Physical activity is crucial to wellness, but often, our noblest of exercise intentions are sabotaged by musculoskeletal injury. With many people doubling-down on fitness and wellness goals for 2016, the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill™ can provide a safe, effective, enjoyable way to improve conditioning, shed excess weight, and achieve better health.

Continue reading “Easily Achieve your 2016 Fitness Resolutions”

Losing 70 Pounds to Keep a Promise

 

Meet Candace Brown

Click to see an interview with Candace and her therapist Susan from the Central Vermont Medical Center

Candace Brown promised her late husband, Walter Brown, that she would run the Boston Marathon.  Before he died, Walter had served as the official starter for the race for 22 years.

In order to keep her promise, Candace used the AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill™ to train for the 26.2 mile race, and in the process lost over 70lbs and reversed her diabetes. Continue reading “Losing 70 Pounds to Keep a Promise”